Categorized | PL, Rants

Manchester United playing the blame game

On Monday morning the vitriol had started. From the #MoyesOut campaign on Twitter to the fallout in the press for Manchester United’s demolition by their city rivals. Watching the game, it was tough to argue with either points and there was an air of ineptitude from the first minute that left a feeling of angst among the United faithful.

Social media was awash with the rumours that Manchester United’s best player is injured and out of the derby. From here the snowball was created and resulted in United’s downfall as it looked like this knocked the confidence of the players and it could be seen on the pitch. Other than Welbeck’s first minute foray into City’s box, at no point did Manchester United really look like a team capable of creating opportunities, let alone scoring and this is a problem that will be inherent for the season unless some changes are made.

David Moyes isn’t far into his tenure but he should know better than to blame the players when tactically he was shown up to the world’s viewing eyes. He claimed that he has never suffered at the hands of Manchester City in this way when he was the Everton manager and herein lies the problem; this isn’t Everton, this is Manchester United, the champions elect. Once the rumours had been confirmed that Robin Van Persie wasn’t in the match day squad, everyone had their opinion of what the team should be. These opinions circled around the fact that United would play a variation of the 4-2-3-1 system and no one would have come up with the starting eleven that actually came out. United are a team that relies on old fashioned wing play coupled with overlapping fullbacks that create goalscoring opportunities. However it was the blue half of Manchester that adopted and executed this system ruthlessly and it couldn’t have been more ever-present than in their first and fourth goals.

On the subject of wingers, the constant inclusion of Ashley Young is now worse than a bad joke. Since his arrival at United in 2011 he has never looked up to the task of being a Manchester United winger. Last season he provided three assists and other than ‘those’ two goals against Arsenal in his debut season, has he ever provided the kind of threat required at this level? More to the point, has he ever made another team worry once they’ve seen him included in the starting eleven? It is tough to explain Ashley Young when there are players who can change games in the squad. Namely Zaha and Januzaj not even making the bench with Nani keeping it warm doesn’t even create conjecture. Antonio Valencia was good against Leverkusen but not great, let’s not get ahead of ourselves as this is the same Valencia but with a different squad number. This was just as apparent yesterday as it has been all season bar that one aforementioned game. Given that his shortcomings as an attacking player have been exhausted by all, his inclusion must be merited on his defensive capabilities and with that gone (as was apparent in their first goal), what is his basis for inclusion in the next game?

The use of ‘hard working’ wingers and a more robustness to the team is how David Moyes is displaying his cautious mindset as a manager. Deploying two like-minded defensive midfielders, one of which is his darling from Everton, and the constant running of Danny Welbeck plus the two attackingly inept wingers is erring on the side of caution. It protects against a loss as opposed to going there to win and these same tactics have been displayed against Chelsea (h) and Liverpool (a) yet only one point has been gained. This is Manchester United, comparisons to Everton are nonsensical and Moyes needs to be shorn of this cautious mindset in order to flourish at this club. Playing 4-4-2 against the riches of Manchester City was a car crash waiting to happen and you have to remember that City paid £30m to put Fernandinho next to one of Europe’s best midfielders. (Fernandinho made more tackles/interceptions/key passes than the whole of Manchester United’s midfield). After the game Moyes claimed that United couldn’t get to grips with Manchester City’s midfield and due to that, they dominated the game. What confidence does that instil in the fans? More to the point, what does that tell the rest of the managers in the league? That tactically, Moyes got it very wrong. Playing the way they did was more to combat the way that Manchester City were set up yet Pellegrini set up in only one way; to get a victory. That’s the difference here and changes need to come quickly against Liverpool in the cup on Wednesday. This point is further compounded with Tom Cleverley’s introduction when United were 4-0 down. As much as it made hearts sink to see Tom taking his tracksuit off, it did bring stability to United. It may have been down to fatigue in the Manchester City team or the fact they were 4-0 up however it gave Manchester United more of the ball in the final third of the game. This change should have been made at half time when it was clear as day that United were being overrun for an entire half of the game. Yet it leads people to think that why was this not foreseen before the match? Welbeck played as a striker, as did Rooney and 4-4-2 does not work away from home to a title rival, it hasn’t for a number of years and it didn’t on Sunday. 4-2-3-1 is not a cautious formation, it is not entirely attacking either, what it does do is afford the opportunity to manager and players alike to adapt to a football match and it is a shame Shinji Kagawa could not get a game. That, however, is a discussion for another day.

After the game the bile inducing comments about United’s opening fixtures were again mentioned by Moyes. “Any manager would have found it difficult taking over the club with that run of fixtures.” and “It’s been a difficult start – the way the balls came out at the start of the season, I said I wasn’t convinced, and I’m still not convinced.” were mentioned by Moyes post-game and as embarrassing as the team looked on Sunday, the whole club are looking even more embarrassing citing a conspiracy that has not an ounce of evidence to back it up. To point to this as the reason Manchester United have made their worst start since finishing 3rd in 2006 rather than beat what’s in front of them is not an avenue that Moyes can be afforded. Firstly due to the fact he isn’t Sir Alex Ferguson who was all for conspiracies against United but namely that he is the manager of a completely different entity to Everton. Claiming that he’s not been demolished like that as their manager (which is laughable given their failure to win away to a top 5 club in a decade) has no place in a post-match interview. He has to choose when he’s wearing his Manchester United suit or his Everton tracksuit and decisions like that were the reason he’s hired so let’s hope that he chooses the former rather than the latter going forward.

Caution shouldn’t be overlooked however pragmatism is best served with an equal measure of optimism. Now David Moyes’s attempts to alleviate pressure on himself has backfired and he looks more out of his depth than he did before he started the job in July. Had he placated the fans by taking the majority of the blame by looking inwardly at his own tactics rather than pointing the finger at his players, this Monday could have looked a whole lot different.

One Response to “Manchester United playing the blame game”

  1. TR says:

    Agree entirely about Moyes.

    Though, just one small thing…
    United aren’t “champions elect”, we’re just the champions.
    ‘Champions elect’ is when you’re set to be crowned champion

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